ABC: National Broadcaster hosts conceited progressive debate: Greens and Labor MPs blame Aussie Culture and Tony Abbott for Islamic Terrorism


Australia: Its your ABC: “I don’t think that the language that has been used over the last couple of years has been very inclusive; I think it’s been quite divisive and destructive,” said Labor senator Lisa Singh. “It is as though our society and politics create the Islamist threat”.  “We, I think, ourselves, as a society are helping create some of the conditions that make it easier for others to then come along and say, see, this society doesn’t have a place for you,” Greens MP Adam Bandt said. Australia: Q and A its your ABC: (thanks to Dallas Beaufort)

The ABC left clique aids and abets the disillusioned as terrorism abounds while continuing their lost noble savage mantra.

ABC Q and A panel dominated by progessives

ABC Q and A panel dominated by progessives

Questions about terrorism deserve honest answers

THE AUSTRALIAN OCTOBER 14, 2015

The ABC will need to vastly improve its coverage of issues surrounding Islamist extremism if this nation is going to deal adequately with the threat and its consequences.
Rather than desperately attempting to trumpet its multicultural sensibilities and parade its religious tolerance, the national broadcaster ought to be capable of leading debate about how to combat a threat that is confounding governments and security agencies around the world.

Islamic Zaky Mallah, a Man Monis II, invited to preach Islamic State hate on 'Your ABC'

Islamic Zaky Mallah, a Man Monis II, invited to preach Islamic State hate on ‘Your ABC’

Monday night’s discussion on Q&A provided a typically superficial take on the issue where the program host and panellists were so desperate not to offend that they risked seriously downplaying the threats while also feeding the victim mythology that extremist recruiters seek to exploit.

“We, I think, ourselves, as a society are helping create some of the conditions that make it easier for others to then come along and say, see, this society doesn’t have a place for you,” Greens MP Adam Bandt said.

“I mean, you can literally be a young Muslim boy and say the word ISIS and end up in the principal’s office and possibly be led away in handcuffs,” said Sheik Wesam Charkawi, a Muslim community worker.

“I don’t think that the language that has been used over the last couple of years has been very inclusive; I think it’s been quite divisive and destructive,” said Labor senator Lisa Singh. It is as though our society and politics create the Islamist threat.

ABC QandA Presenter Tony Jones

ABC Q and A Presenter Tony Jones

Q&A is not the only offender; we have seen a range of ABC programs swing into a default post-terror attack setting that means asking what we have done to inflame Islamist extremists.

If it is not the nation’s involvement in foreign wars it will be our attitudes to Muslim Australians or, as has been suggested on ABC radio in the wake of the Parramatta terrorist murder, the bullying of young Muslims at school.

We wonder why it never occurs to journalists promoting these views that most of the world’s Islamist terrorists have come from majority Muslim countries where these triggers cannot have been a factor. Or why other immigrant groups, such as Chinese, South African, Italian or Vietnamese, haven’t reacted to the difficulties of integration with similar indiscriminate violence. No matter our faith, ethnicity or politics, we cannot deal with the current threat unless we are prepared to consider the central motivation behind it: jihadist or Islamist extremism.

farhadkahlilmohammadjabar

Gun battle following Parramatta gunman Farhad Khalil Mohammad Jabar’s shooting of police accountant

Australians have been shocked by three domestic terror attacks in the past 13 months leading to the deaths of three innocent citizens and three extremists.

In the same period we have become aware of more than 120 domestic jihadists who have travelled to the Middle East to join the Islamic State slaughter — up to 20 have been killed, including in suicide attacks.
Still others have been intercepted at airports on their way to Syria or Iraq, while more than a dozen are serving long jail terms over thwarted terror plots including an AFL grand final plan and an assault on the Holsworthy army base.

At least 130 Australians have been killed in overseas jihadist attacks since 9/11, mostly to bombings in Indonesia but also to attacks in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Like many countries, we face a radicalisation threat. It also occurs across North Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia and in parts of Europe.

“If we take this issue and we restrict it to the Muslim narrative and we say that this is a Muslim problem,” Sheik Charkawi said on Q&A, “what happens is you can’t then step back and look for other empirical evidence as to any underpinning or driving forces that may be at hand here.

aussie mom and kids (multiculturalism)

aussie mom and kids, “Behead those who insult the Prophet”

” Yet to ignore the Islamist motivation behind the global terrorism threat is to deny the problem.

We are dealing with the export and proselytisation of extreme Wahhabism from the Arabian Peninsula. It is fuelled in part by the Sunni-Shia schism and is not driven by grievances, whether they are as mundane as schoolyard bullying or as strategic as the Israel-Palestine conflict. Rather, the motivation is an absolutist desire for a global caliphate imposing sharia law on all. It cannot be appeased.

Multicultural tolerance is, of course, a worthwhile goal in itself and can help minimise opportunities for extremists to prey on vulnerable recruits. But such issues are not the heart of the issue. And self-loathing critiques of our successful immigration story feed into the extremist lure more than the solution.

Sheik Charkawi may well say there is “no obstacle to Muslims and Christians living together and this has happened historically and I can cite you many, many examples”, but this is not the problem.

The issue is where this is not happening: in Iraq, Syria, Nigeria, Libya and myriad other places where Christians have been deliberately and sometimes routinely slaughtered.

Muslims too are killed as collateral damage or because they are considered apostates.

Hundreds of our citizens support this extremist ideology, and all of us are exposed to risks at home and abroad. So we must have frank debates and not pretend that groupthink and group hugs can make it all go away.

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